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We’re excited to announce that Nextgen Reader will add support for Feedly before Google Reader retires.

As you may know, Feedly is working on the Normandy project, to help keep the vibrant ecosystem of Google Reader apps that people love. We’re delighted to be part of this project, along with some of the best Google Reader apps on other platforms. You can read the announcement here.

feedly_nextgen

We’ll update apps on both WP8 and Windows 8 this month. And specially for our long-term customers, we’ll also update the WP7 version to support Feedly, hopefully next month or as early as possible.

Finally, a big THANK YOU to all of our users for supporting us.

Happy Reading!
– Next Matters

P.S. More news on the beta next week.

Related posts

Feedly: Feedly is listening: the roadmap you helped us shape

WinSource: Nextgen Reader announces support for Feedly

WPCentral: Nextgen Reader will live on; announces support for Feedly RSS service

themobilefanatics network: Feedly sync coming to Windows Phone via Nextgen Reader app

coolsmartphone: Nextgen Reader will soon support Feedly

Neowin: As Google Reader fades Feedly makes its move

Windows Phone Daily: NextGen Reader will integrate with Feedly in transition away from Google Reader

Google announced today that it’s shutting down Google Reader on July 1, 2013. It’s not a big surprise to us as we knew that it was going to happen someday but may be not so soon. Anyways, R.I.P. Google Reader – we loved you and we’ll miss you as developers although you never gave us an official API. 😉

But, the even bigger surprise to us is your support for Nextgen Reader. Since the announcement, we’ve received hundreds of emails and messages on Twitter/Facebook/etc. Please be assured that Nextgen Reader will continue to work perfectly across Windows & Windows Phone and we’re already looking into various alternatives:

  • Hosting our own service on Windows Azure.
  • Newsblur support.
  • Normandy – Feedly support.

More importantly, if you have any thoughts or suggestions, please share them below in comments or feel free to send a mail, or reach us via Twitter and Facebook anytime.

We’ll share further details very soon… hopefully next week or before end of this month. Till then we request you to keep using Google Reader for next few weeks.

Thank you again for your patience and support!

So, a lot has happened over the last few weeks!

  • Starting with Windows Phone 7 “Mango” announcement on May 24th, followed by a peek into Windows future i.e. “Windows 8” and last but not least iOS5 announcement recently. Check out the video below if you missed it:
[youtube=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=p92QfWOw88I]

Well, till today I hold the special feeling that WP7 is a different kind of phone and the “Mango” announcement has made me feel even more strong along with Nokia+Skype combination, Windows Phone will be a massive hit in the future. Looking at the iOS5 details, I too feel flattered and agree with @joebelfiore (design head of WP7), that Apple has taken lot of stuff from WP7 (Android as well), and baked into iOS5 smartly. But the thing that impresses me is, “Apple” responded greatly to the competition and finally iOS in it’s 5th incarnation packs a lot of desired features that Apple fans would have wished for years.

Seriously speaking, WP7 is still playing a catch-up game and Microsoft needs to catch up at a faster pace to win the smartphone battle but I’ve no doubts that they have the best foundation with WP7, and the complete focus on end-user experience.

Moving to tablets now, which is my favorite topic these days and is supposed to come up if you’re chatting with me. So, I’ve been waiting longtime for “Windows 8” announcement, because it’s a different approach to what Apple and Google have done, that is not building a phone OS first and turning into a tablet OS later. Till today I don’t feel, people buy tablets to replace their notebooks, simple reason is – it’s not productive or the other way around tablet is meant only for portable, comfortable and enjoyable experience.

Yes, they could replace the PC for few who just live on one side of the world i.e. consuming information like browsing, reading, music/video but otherwise it’s a – one more important addition to your gadget life (i.e. smartphone, tablet and a notebook).

However, fast forward few years from here and I could see tablets being part of massive convergence where you’ll have a hybrid device which can replace the trivia of tablet, netbook/notebook and PC. Yes, everything! Don’t agree, look at ASUS Eee Pad Transformer today, it is a tablet-come-netbook duo for some, but the overall experience is just not there yet. Lets take the standard tablet hardware today – it’s a dual core processor with 1 GB RAM and may be 64/128MB graphics. In around one to one and half-year from now, we’ll have quad-core processors with 2GB RAM and 256MB graphics in same price range , so it would match the speeds of what a decent netbook has today! So by the time, “Windows 8” comes out next year, the devices will be capable of running a full-fledged desktop OS.

But more important is the tablet side of Windows 8. I expected Metro UI to overtake this role, so it was no surprise as a windows phone developer & its a great joy to see that really happening on Windows 8. And we all know how good Metro interface is with live tiles for tablet computing. So, there you go, its “Microsoft” who can really build a powerful duo device that can turn into a tablet with it’s immersive Metro UI experience while you’re on the go and when you stop simply dock it to have the worlds most powerful desktop OS at your service.

Moreover, there is no more need for your tablet and notebook to be in sync if it becomes one hybrid device. I bet you’ll save lots of money by not having to sync and download data from cloud to different devices.

However, saying all this is easy, but there are good number of challenges that Microsoft needs to solve for everything to fall in place. And they are doing that by first supporting ARM architecture as well, which is huge in itself as we move to SOC world (System-on-a-chip). Nevertheless, it’s possible OF COURSE! I could maybe talk of some challenges in future… , but now I need to get back to NG Reader.

Catch you soon here to share details on NextGen Reader v1.11